"Come, follow me," Jesus said, "and I will send you out to fish for people." 

Matthew 4:19

 

Our Faith Journey

Scripture

Grace

OUR VALUES

Social Principles

Faith is the basic orientation and commitment of our whole being—a matter of heart and soul. Christian faith is grounding our lives in the living God as revealed especially in Jesus Christ. It’s both a gift we receive within the Christian community and a choice we make. It’s trusting in God and relying on God as the source and destiny of our lives. Faith is believing in God, giving God our devoted loyalty and allegiance. Faith is following Jesus, answering the call to be his disciples in the world. Faith is hoping for God’s future, leaning into the coming kingdom that God has promised. Faith-as-belief is active; it involves trusting, believing, following, hoping.

In thinking about our faith, we put primary reliance on the Bible. It’s the unique testimony to God’s self-disclosure in the life of Israel; in the ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus the Christ; and in the Spirit’s work in the early church. It’s our sacred canon and, thus, the decisive source of our Christian witness and the authoritative measure of the truth in our beliefs.

 

In our theological journey we study the Bible within the believing community. Even when we study it alone, we’re guided and corrected through dialogue with other Christians. We interpret individual texts in light of their place in the Bible as a whole. We use concordances, commentaries, and other aids prepared by the scholars. With the guidance of the Holy Spirit, we try to discern both the original intention of the text and its meaning for our own faith and life.

Taking an active stance in society is nothing new for followers of John Wesley. He set the example for us to combine personal and social piety. Ever since predecessor churches to United Methodism flourished in the United States, we have been known as a denomination involved with people's lives, with political and social struggles, having local to international mission implications. Such involvement is an expression of the personal change we experience in our baptism and conversion.

 

The United Methodist Church believes God's love for the world is an active and engaged love, a love seeking justice and liberty. We cannot just be observers. So we care enough about people's lives to risk interpreting God's love, to take a stand, to call each of us into a response, no matter how controversial or complex. The church helps us think and act out a faith perspective, not just responding to all the other 'mind-makers-up' that exist in our society."

With many other Protestants, we recognize the two sacraments in which Christ himself participated: baptism and the Lord's Supper.

 

Baptism:

 

Through baptism we are joined with the church and with Christians everywhere.

Baptism is a symbol of new life and a sign of God's love and forgiveness of our sins.

Persons of any age can be baptized.

We baptize by sprinkling, immersion or pouring.

A person receives the sacrament of baptism only once in his or her life.

 

The Lord's Supper (Holy Communion, Eucharist):

 

The Lord's Supper is a holy meal of bread and wine that symbolizes the body and blood of Christ.

The Lord's Supper recalls the life, death and resurrection of Jesus and celebrates the unity of all the members of God's family.

By sharing this meal, we give thanks for Christ's sacrifice and are nourished and empowered to go into the world in mission and ministry.

We practice "open communion," welcoming all who love Christ, repent of their sin, and seek to live in peace with one another.